See the 2019 Pulitzer Prize photography award winners

The winners were awarded a $15,000 prize for the work.

children among migrants
A migrant girl traveling with a caravan of thousands from Central America en route to the U.S. holds her belongings while making her way to Mapastepec from Huixtla, Mexico at sunrise on October 24, 2018.Adrees Latif

The 2019 Pulitzer Prize winners were announced this week at the Columbia School of Journalism. The photography staff from Reuters took first place for Breaking News Photography and Lorenzo Tugnoli of The Washington Post took first place for Feature Photography. The winners each won $15,000 as their prize.

The Reuters team earned the first place win with coverage of migrants from Central and South America seeking asylum in the United States. The judges commended the team on the “vivid and startling visual narrative” that depicted “the urgency, desperation and sadness of migrants.” The winning group included images from Goran Tomasevic, Adrees Latif, Ueslei Marcelino, Edgard Garrido, Kim Kyung Hoon, Mike Blake, and others.

Lorenzo Tugnoli of The Washington Post earned his first place Feature Photography win for his coverage of the famine in Yemen. The body of work was originally in the Breaking News category, but moved by the jury into the Feature Photography category. Tugnoli lives in Beirut and has covered the Middle East extensively. The judges praised his work for images where “beauty and composure are intertwined with devastation.”

See all of 2019 Pulitzer Prize winners and the finalists at www.pulitzer.org.

migrant caravan
A migrant caravan from Central America proceeds towards Tapachula from Ciudad Hidalgo, after crossing the Guatemala border into Mexico, while en route to the United States on October 21, 2018.Adrees Latif
Man holding and protecting a baby
A Honduran migrant protects his child after fellow migrants, part of a caravan trying to reach the U.S., stormed a border checkpoint at the Guatemala - Mexico border, in Ciudad Hidalgo on October 19, 2018.Ueslei Marcelino
Migrant child screaming in a crowd
A migrant boy, part of a caravan from Central America trying to reach the U.S., cries due to excess heat and humidity as migrants seek asylum at the Guatemala Mexico border checkpoint in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on October 20, 2018.Edgard Garrido
child being carried across shallow water
Luis Acosta, helps carry 5-year-old Angel Jesus, both from Honduras, as a caravan of migrants from Central America en route to the United States crossed through the Suchiate River into Mexico from Guatemala in the outskirts of Tapachula, Mexico, October 29, 2018. A second caravan of migrants bound for the U.S. border waded through the Suchiate River into Mexico after they clashes with Mexican police at the border bridge. Dozens were injured and one was killed by a rubber bullet.Adrees Latif
Migrants fleeing
Maria Meza, a 40-year-old migrant woman from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, runs away from tear gas with her five-year-old twin daughters Saira Mejia Meza (L) and Cheili Mejia Meza (R) in front of the border wall between the U.S and Mexico, in Tijuana, Mexico on November 25, 2018.Kim Kyung Hoon
Young migrant girl being detained
U.S. Border Patrol agent Marcelino Medina looks for others as he apprehends a migrant woman and man for illegally crossing into the U.S. border from Mexico near McAllen, Texas on May 2, 2018.Adrees Latif
little girl detained
A nine year old migrant girl from Guatemala sits in the back of a U.S. Border Patrol vehicle after she was apprehended for illegally crossing into the U.S. from Mexico in Sunland Park, New Mexico on June 14, 2018.Adrees Latif
a line of migrants detained in a camp
Migrant children are led by staff in single file between tents at a detention facility next to the Mexican border in Tornillo, Texas on June 18, 2018.Mike Blake
carrying a casket
Friends and family carry a coffin with the remains of Jakelin Caal, a 7-year-old girl Guatemalan girl who died after she and her father were detained by U.S. border agents, during her funeral in her home village of San Antonio Secortez, Guatemala on December 25, 2018.Carlos Barria
destroyed ruins along roads of Yemen
A woman walks past a destroyed building in the al Jahmaliya area. The area was heavily damaged during fighting between Houthi rebels and local militias struggling to retake the city. More recently, the area was shaken by fighting among the various militias that now control the city.Lorenzo Tugnoli
women and children in Yemen
A clinic in Aslam, Yemen, is overcrowded with malnourished children. Mothers and children share beds, and sometimes mattresses are added to the floor to accommodate all the patients.Lorenzo Tugnoli
children and older man in Yemen
Shakir Jubran al-Musabi, 11, sits inside a hut where a newlywed couple lives in Alraqqah, a remote village in Hajjah province. On April 23, 2018, 20 people at a wedding party died in an airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition fighting Houthi rebels. Shakir and more than 60 other people, mostly children, were injured in the blast.Lorenzo Tugnoli
women in Yemen
Students attend class at the Sir Alibdaa school in the al-Thawra hospital neighborhood of Taiz, Yemen. The school is a few yards away from a road exposed to Houthi sniper fire.Lorenzo Tugnoli
woman in pink head covering in Yemen
Jameela Abdullah stands at the entrance of a roofless house where her family has been living for two months after they escaped fighting in their village of Al-Jarahi. In southern Yemen, a trickle of Yemeni refugees has grown into a flood, with hundreds abandoning their homes each day. Refugee camps have sprung up across the region, adding pressure on western aid agencies and hospitals while worsening a humanitarian crisis that’s already considered the most severe in the world. Most people were running away from clashes near the strategic port city of Hodeida, under siege by Yemeni forces aligned with a U.S.-backed coalition, led by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.Lorenzo Tugnoli
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