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Vital Impacts, a non-profit founded by Ami Vitale, one of our favorite National Geographic photographers, and visual journalist Eileen Mignoni, is having a print sale to support Direct Relief, a charity currently providing humanitarian aid to Ukraine. From now until April 20, 2022, you can support a good cause by picking up a print from National Geographic photographers like Paul Nicklen, Brian Skerry, Jimmy Chin, Frans Lanting, and many more. The last Vital Impacts print sale raised $620,000 for conservation charities, but this time they’re hoping to raise $1 million.

You can purchase a print of the lead image here.

About Direct Relief

In this photo Manisha and Jasmin Singh pause in the Baoli, an ancient step well in a village near the city of Jaipur outside of India’s Thar desert.
“In this photo, Manisha and Jasmin Singh pause in the Baoli, an ancient stepwell in a village near the city of Jaipur outside of India’s Thar desert.” Purchase a print here. Ami Vitale / Courtesy of Vital Impacts

All profits from this Vital Impacts sale go to Direct Relief, a humanitarian aid organization that is working in Ukraine to help those affected by Russia’s invasion. 

Since the start of the war, Direct Relief has provided more than 164 tons of much-needed medical supplies. It’s working with the Ukrainian Ministry of Health as well as other groups in the conflict zone to supply “emergency response packs intended for first responders, oxygen concentrators, critical care medicines, and much more.” It is providing support for both people still in Ukraine, and refugees who have fled to surrounding countries such as Poland. 

For more on how Direct Relief is supporting Ukraine, check out the aid tracker on its website. The organization is committed to transparency (although some specifics are currently being withheld for security reasons) and is widely regarded as one of the most efficient and effective charities in the US when it comes to providing relief.

What photographers are involved?

Warming one another’s hands in the bitter cold, a couple going fellow Ukrainian demonstrators on the main square in Kyiv, where thousands gathered to protest presidential election fraud.
“Warming one another’s hands in the bitter cold, a couple going fellow Ukrainian demonstrators on the main square in Kyiv, where thousands gathered to protest presidential election fraud. Ukraine’s so-called “Orange Revolution” protests and political events took place across the country from Nov. 2004 to Jan. 2005, in the immediate aftermath of the run-off vote between leading candidates Viktor Yushchenko and Viktor Yanukovych. The Ukrainian presidential election was marred by massive corruption, voter intimidation, and electoral fraud. The nationwide protests succeeded, the original run-off was annulled, and a revote was ordered by Ukraine’s Supreme Court.” Purchase a print here. David Guttenfelder / Courtesy of Vital Impacts

The invasion of Ukraine compelled Vitale and Mignoni “to spring to action quickly and create a new initiative to support people caught in conflict zones.” Despite the short timeframe, they managed to convince 112 of their fellow photographers to donate some of their iconic works.

Like the last sale, the list of people involved is a who’s who of modern photographers, including David Doubilet, Joe McNally, Jim Richardson, Robin Hammond, Jodi Cobb, and a lot more. 

Unlike last time’s nature-themed sale, there is more variety here, including travel shots, cityscapes, and protest photos. There are also a number of photos from Ukraine, like David Guttenfelder’s image of protestors during the Orange Revolution in the mid-2000s and Dina Litovsky’s reminder of better times in Kyiv. 

How do I buy a print?

Yosemite Valley after the Storm.
“Yosemite Valley after the Storm.” Purchase a print here. Jimmy Chin / Courtesy of Vital Impacts

You can buy a print from Vital Impact’s website between now and April 20. All 112 prints are available as 11x16s for $275 and 16x24s for $675. 

The paper for the run has been donated by Canson Infinity and 100% of the profits from each sale will be donated to Direct Relief.

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