New Gear: Leica M Edition 60

First look at Leica's LCD-free camera system

Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
Audi’s design team probably felt that strap lugs would ruin the sleek curve of the Leica 60’s rounded sides.Leica

At the Photokina trade show this year Leica announced that they would be making a special 60th anniversary version of the M (typ 240) to mark this milestone for the company's iconic camera system. In conjunction with Audi's industrial designers, Leica created a camera that they say is dedicated to, "reductionism as a celebration of photographic art." What this means is a digital rangefinder body that has no LCD screen and only gives you control over shutter speed, aperture, focusing, and ISO.

Given a few moments with the camera, we didn’t even notice a way to format an SD card. Add to that the fact that it has no lugs with which to attach a camera strap and you have to wonder if Leica expects these collectible cameras to ever be used to make photos at all. They’re lovely to look at though.

Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
Audi’s design team probably felt that strap lugs would ruin the sleek curve of the Leica 60’s rounded sides.Leica
Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
The Leica 60 is shown here with its kit lens, the 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M. A special version of the 50mm f/0.95 Noctilux-M, with matching silver paint, is available for $11,350.Leica
Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
The ISO wheel on the back seems a natural replacement for the LCD screen, especially given the way that this location was sometimes used as a reminder of the currently loaded film speed before the digital age.Leica
Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
There’s no red Leica dot on the Leica 60, just as the original M body had no such circular badge.Leica
Leica M Edition 60
Leica M Edition 60
You may already be out of luck if you want to buy one of the 600 limited edition Leica 60 kits. We’ve been told that all of them have been preordered, despite the $18,500 price tag.Leica