Rediscovering Richard Crump Miller and His Vivid Images of Marilyn Monroe

Some artists are discovered only after they have left us. Richard Crump Miller’s longevity has allowed him to bask in some well-deserved fame. s Hudson Valley with his daughter Jan, recently paid a visit to his former home, Los Angeles, to see his work hanging alongside that of another pioneer of color photography, Paul Outerbridge, at a wonderful exhibition at the Getty Center. The show, curated by Getty Assistant Curator Paul Martineau, runs through August 9.

Some artists are discovered only after they have left us. Richard Crump Miller's longevity has allowed him to bask in some well-deserved fame.
     Miller, now 97 and living in New York's Hudson Valley with his daughter Jan, recently paid a visit to his former home, Los Angeles, to see his work hanging alongside that of another pioneer of color photography, Paul Outerbridge, at a wonderful exhibition at the Getty Center. The show,
curated by Getty Assistant Curator Paul Martineau, runs through August 9.
     Miller was a practitioner of carbro color printing, a painstaking process that yielded vivid images with saturated colors and glossy black tones. Based in L.A., he also photographed plenty of actors and actresses, including one seductive model named Norma Jean Dougherty. Now Miller's work is getting the attention it deserves, and the world can see his largely overlooked pictures of the young woman who would become known as Marilyn Monroe.