Tip of the Day: Extreme Photo

Some of the best pictures are born of the worst conditions. Here are some ways to get rewarding photos in challenging situations.• From the air: The main technical challenge is vibration, so set a fast shutter speed and use a normal or telephoto lens with image stabilization. Also, propellers often show up in photos, even when their spinning keeps you from seeing them when you look out the window.• Underwater: Water absorbs light selectively, appearing greener near the surface and more blue deep

Some of the best pictures are born of the worst conditions. Here are some ways to get rewarding photos in challenging situations.

• From the air: The main technical challenge is vibration, so set a fast shutter speed and use a normal or telephoto lens with image stabilization. Also, propellers often show up in photos, even when their spinning keeps you from seeing them when you look out the window.

• Underwater: Water absorbs light selectively, appearing greener near the surface and more blue deeper down. Get accurate color with flash units designed for underwater photography.

• Cold: Frigid weather can sap battery power, and going inside can cause condensation on your equipment. Enclose your gear in plastic bags or an airtight box and let it warm up before removing it.

• Heat: Most new cameras work in temperatures hotter than people even can handle. But in high humidity, mold grows fast on film and electronics. So keep your gear in a waterproof container with pack of silica gel.

ADAPTED FROM FUNDAMENTALS OF PHOTOGRAPHY: THE ESSENTIAL HANDBOOK FOR BOTH DIGITAL AND FILM CAMERAS BY TOM ANG (RANDOM HOUSE, 2008; $25)

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