Tip of the Day: Foreground Framing

One of the most striking field techniques around is foreground framing. Used effectively, it helps direct the viewer's eye right to the photo's star attraction. Read more in this photography article by BetterPhoto instructor Kerry Drager:Options: Frames come in all shapes and sizes. Some surround an entire background subject, while other frames are partial ones: i.e., side, bottom, or top.

One of the most striking field techniques around is foreground framing. Used effectively, it helps direct the viewer's eye right to the photo's star attraction. Read more in this photography article by BetterPhoto instructor Kerry Drager:
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Options:** Frames come in all shapes and sizes. Some surround an entire background subject, while other frames are partial ones: i.e., side, bottom, or top. Examples of framing devices include overhanging tree branches, arches, windows, doors, sculptures, fences, looming rock formations, fountains, flowers, architectural elements, a companion's outstretched arm, or a nearby hot-air balloon in a colorful race.

Composition: Although a foreground border often spotlights your center of interest, an extra-special frame sometimes serves as the primary subject itself. Also, a frame can show a subject in relation to its surroundings and can even produce a three-dimensional effect, in which the scene sweeps away from front to back.
(photo by Kerry Drager)