Tip of the Day: 3 ways to void your Warranty

1) eBay Batteries: If you buy a battery anywhere other than a reputable dealer, even if it has the manufacturer’s name on it, there’s no way to know if it’s legit. Knockoff batteries can fry your camera, and if it’s not made by your camera company, the damage won’t be covered.

Now that you’ve bought a new DSLR, make sure that you don’t make one of these mistakes, each guaranteed to void your camera’s warranty.

1) eBay Batteries: If you buy a battery anywhere other than a reputable dealer, even if it has the manufacturer’s name on it, there’s no way to know if it’s legit. Knockoff batteries can fry your camera, and if it’s not made by your camera company, the damage won’t be covered.

2) 1970s Flash: We know you love your Vivitar 283 and 285 flashes, but save them for your old film cameras. Flashes from the 1960s and 1970s often have voltage that is too high for new cameras. Rather than risk frying your circuitry (and voiding your warranty), buy a new flash. If you must use an older flash, try a Wein Safe Sync ($50, street) to regulate the voltage.

3) Gluing Anything: Most DIY repairs will void your warranty, especially if you touch anything inside your camera. Need to make a quick fix before taking your camera in for repairs? Use gaffer tape. A photographer on SportsShooter.com reported that the fumes from strong adhesives such as cyanoacrylate-based glue (e.g., Superglue, Krazy Glue) melted the sensor on his lightmeter.
—Kathleen Davis
Assistant Editor