Personal Project: Robert Buelteman

American Photo: The California pro uses electricity to bring power to his art.

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After convincing a police officer that he wasn’t stealing, buelteman took this branch of eucalyptus from a country club. the image (“Eucalyptus polyanthemos,” 2000) was created using small, selective pulses of light via a fiber-optic probe. the discharges show up as blue where the stems are close to the film and plate, and where the plant is farther away, the image blurs.Robert Buelteman
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Robert Buelteman
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For “mitch’s roses” (2004), buelteman climbed a ladder and let rose petals fall onto the film randomly.Robert Buelteman
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A study in life and decay, “russian river oak” (2007) pairs a living leaf with a dead one, plucked from an oak on the banks of the russian river in northern California. For the “texture,” buelteman overlaid the leaves with a worn, 1-inch-thick, front-silvered piece of glass from Stanford research institute’s laser lab, pulled from his glass collection.Robert Buelteman
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To showcase diversity of color within a single species, robert buelteman chose rainbow chard, grown in his garden specifically for this purpose. Five specimens were scanned separately, then combined to produce a single work (“rainbow Chard,” 2009). buelteman’s amped-up version of Kirlian photography here incorporated a 100-micrometer-thick fiber-optic strand, a tungsten bulb and several filters — plus 1,000 volts of electricity.Robert Buelteman
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After convincing a police officer that he wasn’t stealing, buelteman took this branch of eucalyptus from a country club. the image (“Eucalyptus polyanthemos,” 2000) was created using small, selective pulses of light via a fiber-optic probe. the discharges show up as blue where the stems are close to the film and plate, and where the plant is farther away, the image blurs.Robert Buelteman
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Robert Buelteman
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For “Cyclamen persicum” (2000) buelteman used minimal electricity so that the image would have warmth and mystery.Robert Buelteman
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For “White Clematis” (2005), blooms were suspended over the film with copper grounding wires.Robert Buelteman