Camera Test + Video: Lomography Konstruktor 35mm Film SLR

We spent two hours painstakingly putting this DIY camera together, and have a time lapse to prove it

kunstruktor.jpg
Did building this camera make me pull out my hair? Yes. Did I get a better appreciation for the inner-workings of an SLR? Absolutely. So, is it worth the price? Read on….Dan Bracaglia

When I first found out about Lomography's Konstruktor DIY camera kit, I was pretty excited. I shoot quite a bit of film, and despite being 25-years-old, I still consider myself to be a total Lego Maniac. So the concept of a build-your-own camera seemed very appealing.

First thing Monday morning, I started work on my Konstruktor with a level of excitment most unusual for the start of a work week. However, more than once throughout the building process I found my excitment turning to frustratation (and at least once, my frustration led to a near mental breakdown), but the final outcome of the process: a very fun and capable film camera, made it all worthwhile.

The Konstruktor's feature list is likely what you'd expect from a Lomo camera. It uses a single-lens reflex vertical viewfinder (that folds completely flat), a surprisingly sharp f/10 50mm lens, a tripod mount and two shooting modes. Still, it's priced at $35, so you're not really getting a discount or paying a premium for the task of constructing it.

Construction

Konstruktor #1

Konstruktor #1

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.Dan Bracaglia
Konstruktor #3

Konstruktor #3

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.
Konstruktor #2

Konstruktor #2

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.Dan Bracaglia
Konstruktor #5

Konstruktor #5

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.
Konstruktor #6

Konstruktor #6

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.
Konstruktor #4

Konstruktor #4

Shot with Kodak Portra 120 film at 1/80 sec, f/10.