Camera Test: Canon PowerShot S100 Compact

Canon's advanced compact gets a make over in more ways than one

Canon S100 Main

Canon S100 Main

Canon S100Stan Horaczek
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_These shots were all captured in RAW format and exported to full-resolution JPEGs using Adobe Lightroom 3.6 release candidate (at the time of wriring, 3.6 had not yet been made totally official). No edits have been made to the images, except where noted. _ **Tech specs: **F/4 at 1/10 second. 62mm equivalent. ISO 800 At first, I set the cap for auto ISO at 800, but when shooting RAW, i felt comfortable bumping it up to ISO 1600.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech Specs: **F/4.5 at 1/10 second. 68mm equivalent. ISO 800. I only got two shots of this scene becasue I was in a hurry to catch a train, but the S100 focused quickly and accurately. The 1/10th shutter speed didn't cause any unwanted camera shake thanks to the optical IS, but did add some appealing motion blur to some of the people in the train station.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/4 at 1/80 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 80. Under an overcast sky, the S100 produced vivid and accurate colors that are really appealing. However, this image also shows off the distortion from the 24mm lens as well as the fringing on the border between the jacket and the driveway.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech Specs: **F/2 at 1/30 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 125. In case you're curious, this photo depicts battings of fiberglass insulation like the stuff you'll find in most walls. Itchy stuff. But, with some nice window light, it gives the S100 a chance to show what it can do with a lot of very fine details at a relatively low ISO. The orange and pinks are also tough to reproduce for many cameras, but the S100 does a good job keeping things real and not making them look overly saturated or cartoonish.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/5.9 at 1/30 second. 120mm equivalent. ISO 800. In order to cut down on the amount of distortion, I wanted to shoot this wall of cans at the longest possible focal length. Because I was zoomed all the way out, I was limited to F/5.9 and a 1/30 shutter speed in order to combat camera shake. The result is an image that's under exposed by a full stop or more. Since I had a RAW file, it's a simple fix, but this image is a reminder not to get too taken in by that F/2 number.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/5.9 at 1/125 second. 120mm equivalent. ISO 125. Shot at the longest focal length in macro focus setting, this image of a lady bug shows that the S100 is capable of some nice depth of field effects under the right circumstances. You can see that the bug wasn't standing still, yet it still managed to capture a ton of detail.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/2.2 at 1/1250 sec. 24mm equivalent. ISO 80. In order to test the burliness of the flash, I positioned the sun just off to the side of the subjects face. This was shot in program mode with flash set to "always on." As you can see, the face is still well exposed despite the fireball in the center of the frame.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/4 at 1/40 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 80. At this distance, the distortion isn't that bad becasue it's very much expected. The auto color balance had a little bit of trouble in the shade/full-sun mixed lighting combination, but a quick tweak in post would fix that.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/4.5 at 1/50 second. 63mm equivalent. ISO 100. This is the only image in the gallery for which I tweaked the exposure before uploading. The strong backlight caused the subject to be underexposed, so I added a stop of exposure using Lightroom 3.6 release candidate. You can see that, at ISO 100, the shadows still reamin pretty clean, even after having added a stop of exposure, something that is pretty common during post processing. You can also see the fringing in the edges around the bars.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/3.5 at 1/30 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 80. In this case, the S100 did a good job exposing the main portion of the scene despite heavy backlighting. Looking at the histogram suggests it could've used maybe another 1/3-stop, but it's still very acceptable. The wide variety of highly-detailed surfaces in this image also makes it a good example of how good the S100 is in the low ISOs.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/2 at 1/30 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 3200. If you don't click to see the full-resolution file, you might actually be a little surprised to see that this came out of a compact at ISO 3200. It helps that there are no large, solid fields of dark, but this image is totally fine for displaying on the web.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/3.2 at 1/30 second. 24mm equivalent. ISO 80. This donkey didn't stick around for long at the fence, so I fired off a few continuous shots. This kind of scene is where you really miss a DSLR, but it's a shot I would've missed trying to get with my phone.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/4 at 1/160 second. 37mm equivalent. ISO 80. I didn't adjust the exposure at all for this frame, but I did give it a very slight rotation to straighten up the lines. There was a wall just off to the left of the frame, so that darkening wasn't caused by the camera. This is one of the cases where the extra 2-megapixels (when compared to the S95) comes in handy. The low ISO lets you take full advantage of the resolution and preserves small details in the image, like the markings on the woman's coffee cup.Stan Horaczek
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**Tech specs: **F/5.9 at 1/320 second. 120mm equivalent. ISO 6400. As you can see, cranking the ISO up to its maximum setting brings considerable noise to the party, but for online display, it's actually still usable. There's still detail in the tiny, intricate candy wrappers and it still does a good job keeping bright areas from getting too blown out.Stan Horaczek