Hands On: Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10

A Leica kit lens, flip-out LCD and Live View mode make for one L of a camera.

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Hands-On-Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-L10

As more and more consumers graduate to digital SLR cameras, it's not surprising that some manufacturers are looking to ease the transition for the first-timers. Features normally found on compact cameras -- scene modes, face detection autofocus, and live LCD preview - are now commonly found on DSLRs.

Such is the case with Panasonic's newest DSLR, the 10.1-megapixel Lumix DMC-L10, which brings with it several features and functions normally found on EVF-style cameras.

The L10 is a good-looking, solidly built camera featuring a Live MOS sensor and a Leica D Vario-Elmarit 14-50mm f/3.8-5.6 Mega Optical Image Stabilized kit lens. The complete kit will cost you $1,300, estimated street, a price that may frighten off some consumers, particularly existing Four Thirds System photographers who may already have a similar lens in their arsenal, whether it's an older Four Thirds Leica or an Olympus Zuiko lens in the Four Thirds mount.

But for the first-time DSLR buyer, or for the photographer who has decided to switch to the Four Thirds system, the L10's combination of features and functions, particularly EVF-style Live View mode, may be a real selling point of this package.

We've spent the past couple of weeks with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10, traveling from New York City to Vermont and back, taking photos all along the way, and there's a whole heck of a lot to like about this camera.

USING THE OPTICAL AND LCD VIEWFINDERS

We're SLR junkies! Give us an EVF camera and it's usually up at our eyes, SLR-style. And when we've got a full-on SLR, even one with Live View, old habits die hard. A big camera with an optical viewfinder looking through a chunky lens feels like it's meant to be held up to the eye, and most of our test shots were captured in the traditional eye-to-the-rubber fashion. It's not that Live View doesn't have its merits, but the traditional strength of an SLR is the through-the-lens experience.

The Panasonic L10 feels well balanced when mated with the kit Leica glass (3.6x normal zoom at 28-100mm 35mm equivalent). It's got a satisfying SLR heft to it that even the biggest EVF lacks, but for those with very big hands, it may feel a bit on the smaller side. The build quality feels on par with the Canon EOS Rebel XTi and Olympus E-410, but not the much more rugged Pentax K10D or Canon EOS 40D -- 10 megapixel class competitors, all. The fit and finish feels solid all around. All the buttons and dials feel well-damped, without being overly resistant to the touch. The metal lensmount (on both the body and the included lens) and tripod socket add to the feeling of a quality build.

When the camera is up to the eye, it's quick and easy to switch ISO, Metering mode, and the four Optical Autofocus settings (left, right, center, or all) by tapping the relevant back button in the four-way array. It's a nice touch that both the front and rear dials can also be used to dial between these exposure adjustments after tapping the dedicated button, too. White Balance, however, cannot be switched without employing the LCD screen. And, of course, ISO, Metering, and AF can all also be selected by using the LCD screen.

BUTTONS, MODES, AND DIALS

There's one function that appears missing, either via a dedicated button or menu item. Search as you may, there's no obviously apparent Exposure Compensation setting. But don't despair -- it's a simple matter of spinning the rear/thumb dial to push or pull the exposure. (In most modes, that is. In full Automatic mode, both the front and rear dial control exposure compensation.) And in Full Program (P), Aperture-priority (A), and Shutter-priority (S), the front dial will activate program-shift.

In the Advanced Scene Modes that have their own dial settings (Portrait, Sports, Macro, Landscape, and Night shooting), the rear dial almost always controls exposure compensation, while the front button usually controls a program-shift function that allows for increased or decreased shutter speed or aperture, depending on the mode, and the intended feel of the final image, be it panned blur, water freeze or water blur, increased depth of field on a macro, shallow focus on a landscape, and other creative tweaks.

On the handful of SCN-based shooting presets, the rear dial again controls EV compensation, and the front button simply toggles between the five SCN modes. It's a weird mix of SCN modes: Sunset, Food, Baby 1, Baby 2, and Pet. Baby 1, Baby 2, and Pet are pretty much the exact same thing.

FILM MODES

It's standard on modern digital compacts to offer the photographer a selection of contrast and saturation tweaks that may work better for a particular style of photography. The optimum palette for portraiture and the optimum palette for dramatic landscapes at golden hour aren't necessarily the same, so why should the photographer be limited to one set of JPEG-processing presets? Different camera companies call these presets different things, and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 calls them "film modes."

Now, you won't find FujiFilm Velvia, Agfa Scala or Kodak Portra NC, or any other brand-name emulsions you may remember from your film-based days; however, you will find nine (plus two user-selectable "My Films") image quality adjustments when shooting in Program, Aperture-Priority, Shutter-Priority, and Manual exposure modes.

"Standard (Color)" is the base settings for the L10. "Dynamic (Color)" boosts contrast and saturation. "Nature" claims brighter red, greens, and blues (perhaps in the style of a classic landscape slide film?), "Smooth (Color)" lowers contrast (recalling, perhaps a popular portrait film?), "Nostalgic (Color)" lowers both saturation and contrast for an old-time feel. "Vibrant (Color)" has even more saturation and contrast than "Dynamic (Color)," "Standard (B&W)" is the basic grayscale setting, "Dynamic (B&W)" boosts contrast (perhaps in the style of a classic black and white slide film?), and "Smooth (B&W)" smoothes the picture without losing the skin texture, according to the manual. "My film 1 & 2" can be tweaked by the user. All in all, these are pretty apt descriptions for the in-camera processing in the film modes, as we illustrate in our slideshow.

It is nice to see so many quick and easy switches -- from high saturation and contrast to soft, creamy transitions -- quickly and without a lot of post-processing. This can only help photographers realize their personal vision. It seems Panasonic would rather the photographer make pictures that are good to go straight from the camera, rather than spending heaps of time in post-processing. As a quick and easy way to replicate the look of film, the L10's "Film Modes" work pretty well; however, the control freak photographers will probably want to stick with "Standard," which offers great starting data for boosting or reducing contrast or saturation in the digital darkroom, right from the JPEG. And for even more control, shoot RAW plus a film mode for even more control, but keep in mind you're limited to a three-shot burst with RAW.

A $600+ KIT LENS?

The Leica 14-50mm f/3.8-5.6 kit glass is slower than the f/2.8-3.5 kit lens that shipped with the L10's predecessor, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L1. This was a conscious decision most likely done to cut weight and to keep the price from skyrocketing past $1,500 for the kit, which is the only way the DMC-L10 ships. (The Leica 14-50mm is also one of only two current lenses that allow for the full Live View contrast detection autofocusing. More on that later.) Fortunately, the L10 does include Panasonic's Mega Optical Image Stabilization technology, which should help gain back a couple of stops in shutter speed to overcome the shakes, especially when the L10 is held at arm's length utilizing the Live View LCD. We'll let you know how many stops you can expect to gain in our full lab test.

Due to the L10's size and heft, it's tough to compose sharp shots through the LCD viewfinder at arm's length, even with the relatively lightweight kit lens. You'll definitely want to cradle the camera with your left hand under the lens barrel. When you switch out the Leica kit glass for a longer, heavier, faster, non-stabilized Four Thirds lens, such as the Olympus Zuiko 35-100mm f/2, hand-holding at arm's length becomes near impossible, even at fast shutter speeds.

So, for the most part, when it comes to long glass on the L10 without a tripod, we recommend avoiding the Live View mode. Go with the traditional optical viewfinder experience. Of course, if you've got a tripod, feel free to fire away composing through the LCD Live View.

In dimmer, indoor shooting conditions with the Optical Viewfinder, you'll want to turn the LCD off, flip it around or at least turn the brightness way down. The brightness bleeds into your line of sight, and can be seriously distracting.

There's an old Hollywood adage about never working with kids or animals, but for many photographers, kids and pets will often be their main subjects. And so it was in our field tests of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10. Our very willing subjects included a German Shepherd, Bailey, a gray and black shaggy Golden-doodle, Owen, and brother and sister Em and Will. The kids rarely sat still for a few moments, and the dogs rarely sat still at all, so it was a good real-world challenge for the L10. (And no, we did not employ Kids or Pet mode in our tests! We shot in Program and Manual exposure, mostly.)

The camera did a very nice job of keeping up with the action when set to continuous focus in both bright daylight and shady day conditions. In single-shot mode, AF usually locked quickly and accurately on our subjects (stay tuned for our full lab test with AF speed times). We were particularly impressed with the Auto metering, which did a great job of holding detail in the dark and shaggy dog, both in the shade and in high-contrast sunlight scenes.

Kids and dogs move fast, and a moment too late is a moment lost, so we skipped the camera's RAW capture mode, which is ridiculously skimpy by modern standards with only a three-shot burst (at 3 fps) before the buffer locks up. Instead, we shot finest quality JPEGs, which the L10 will keep capturing at three frames per second until you drain the battery or fill the SDHC card.

Did we miss RAW? Not at all! We were impressed by the look of the low ISO JPEG images. The images look good on-screen and the Auto white balance surprised us with its accuracy in challenging situations. In any event, skintones, shadows, and colors look fantastic pretty much straight out of the gate. With all of our test images, we simply needed to make some minor global tweaks to the contrast or saturation to make the image pop before sharing. All of these minor global tweaks to JPEGs can be accomplished effectively in the bundled PhotoFunStudio software, or any image editing program that you're comfortable with that can handle JPEGs.

But the real story here is how little "cooking" the photos from the L10 need. Generally, the shots were good to go straight from the camera. It's as if Panasonic wants you to spend your time making photos -- not fixing them on your computer!

We threw all sorts of challenges at the L10, and for the most part the L10 produced very nice photos of whatever we threw its way, regardless of the shooting conditions.

LCD-BASED SHOOTING; PHASE DIFFERENCE VS. FACE DETECTION

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10's 207,000-dot, 2.5-inch (diagonal) LCD swivels, which is a very good thing since it doesn't have the widest viewing angle we've seen recently. At about 45 degrees above or below along the horizontal axis, colors start to invert, meaning you'll want to position the LCD parallel to your eye for those rakish angle shots. On the playback side, it means the whole family might not be able to gather around the L10 at once to see a slideshow of the day's photos -- unless everyone's at the exact same height in relation to the LCD. But for framing obtuse-angle shots, with the camera held high or low, or dangling over a mountain creek, it's great to be able to swivel the LCD in so many directions. And we'd almost forgotten how great a flip-out LCD is for framing self-timer group portraits!

But the LCD isn't just for playback on the L10, and Panasonic isn't just keeping up with the trend towards Live View modes on DSLRs. They've actually kicked it up a notch with Contrast Autofocus and Face Detection Autofocus in Live View mode. However, the full Live View Autofocusing experience is limited, for now, to just two lenses, the kit Leica D 14-50mm f/3.8-5.6 and the Leica D 14-150mm f/3.5-5.6.

Older Panasonic/Leica lenses and Four Thirds lenses from other manufacturers will revert to the Phase Difference Autofocus in Live View mode. No face detection, no 11-zone focusing on the LCD -- just the three points (selectable individually or all at once) viewable through the optical viewfinder. Like the Canon EOS 40D, the L10 flips the mirror down, achieves Phase difference focus, and refreshes the Live View. It's not stealthy by any means. There's a good bit of mechanical noise when Phase Difference AF is used in Live View mode as the shutter and mirror flip about.

With the kit lens, Live View mode with the full array of Contrast Autofocusing options is much more exciting. It's not perfect, but it is a very interesting evolution. Face Detection locks onto faces very quickly -- even in sunglasses! It won't detect profiles: it needs two eyes visible, but that's par for the course in our experiences with face detection. Live View AF with the kit lens also allows for a much wider area of autofocus coverage, 11 points or 11 blocks that cover a very good percentage of the frame, which can be selected in groups or individually. And there's no LCD freeze while it searches focus because it's all happening in real time. Unfortunately, Live View focus appears limited to "single shot" mode. Don't expect real-time tracking of your sprinter as she approaches the finish line -- not even with Face Detection, which will continue to track a face, but slows down a bit to lock focus before capturing the image.

In Live View mode, the LCD can display the unobstructed scene, or the scene overlaid with the camera settings (with or without live histogram), or with either a "rule of thirds" or quadrant grid pattern to assist in framing. Camera settings plus a live histogram do clutter up the frame, and when edge-to-edge detail is important, you're better off with the unobstructed view or more unobtrusive grids. When shooting in 16:9 or 3:2 aspect ratios (another Live View-only function), the image settings intrude less into the capture area, and the LCD only displays the image in the active aspect ratio capture area.

VERY BASIC PLAYBACK

Playback mode is rudimentary, which is typical for a DSLR. It will play a slideshow of images, one after another at an interval of your choosing. Don't look for spiffy transitions and fades because there aren't any. In-camera image adjustments are limited as well to rotate, resize, crop, and aspect ratio conversion options. You can select favorites, protect images from deletion, and employ DPOF printing, but that's pretty much it.

Toggling the Display button during playback shows either the unobstructed photograph, the photo overlaid with basic camera settings, a thumbnail photo with a deeper set of camera settings, or a thumbnail with four-channel histogram (R,G,B,Y) displays (The Y channel, despite its Yellow coloring, is a Luminance histogram). Regardless of display option, there's virtually no redraw lag between frames, which is a good thing.

OVERALL FIRST IMPRESSIONS

We were impressed with the image quality of low ISO (100-400) shots taken with the L10 on our first look, and we can't wait to check out the lab results. We are, however, a little disappointed with the very limited RAW burst. However, the 3fps JPEG burst to card capacity is class-competitive. For the DSLR beginner and even the advanced enthusiast, the $1,300 street price for the L10 plus the optically stabilized 14-50mm Leica D 14-50mm f/3.8-5.6 might sound scary at first, but if you price out a Canon EOS Rebel XTi, Olympus E-510, or Sony A700 with a similar focal length and speed lens, you'll find that the L10's kit price isn't so bad.

Of course, first impressions are one thing. The other half of the equation is our Full Lab test. We're currently running the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 through our battery of tests. Check back here in a few weeks and also the January issue of Popular Photography & Imaging for our Certified Test Results with Panasonic's newest DSLR.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 35-100mm f/2. ISO 200 1/320 @ f/3.2. In standard capture mode -- not any of the film modes -- there's still great crisp color in this autumn study.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 35-100mm f/2. ISO 200 1/640 @ f/5.0. Evaluative metering let some of the highlights go, but holds fantastic shadow detail in our very dark, very shaggy main subject.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 35-100mm f/2. ISO 200 1/400 @ f/4.0. Continuous focus did a nice job of tracking these fast-moving subjects. Owen, the pup, is one of the fastest dogs I've ever seen.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 35-100mm f/2. ISO 200 1/1000 @ f/6.3. Auto mode did a nice job of holding detail in this high-contrast scene. We did have to add some contrast snap in Adobe Camera RAW 4.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 35-100mm f/2. ISO 200 1/800 @ f/6.3. Despite the challenging lighting conditions at the pond, the L10 kept popping out winners. We boosted the saturation to make the background pop.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with kit D Leica Vario-Elmarit 14-50 f/3.8-5.6. ISO 200 1/80 @ f/5.0. The L10 did a nice job of holding detail in this shaded scene as OctoberFesters listen to the Oompa band at Mount Snow's main beirgarten.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with kit D Leica Vario-Elmarit 14-50 f/3.8-5.6. ISO 200 1/80 @ f/4.8. There are great low tones in this shot along the LT/AT between Bennington and Wilmington, VT, despite a hazy, foggy mid-morning sky.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with kit D Leica Vario-Elmarit 14-50 f/3.8-5.6. ISO 200 1/80 @ f/5.0. There are really nice nuances of color in this mountain forest scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with kit D Leica Vario-Elmarit 14-50 f/3.8-5.6. ISO 200 1/80 @ f/5.0. We used the Live View feature with the LCD flipped out to get a low angle while hanging over rocks of this little creek scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 100 1/500 @ f/4. There's great detail in both shadows and midtones in this midday action scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 100 1/500 @ f/4. We locked our exposure on Bailey in the foreground and recomposed this scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 100 1/320 @ f/3.2. The L10 did a very nice job of holding shadow and highlight detail in the challenging scene along a feeder trail into the AT/LT in Vermont.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 100 1/320 @ f/3.5. There's just a touch of blown highlights in the hottest parts of this challenging sun and shade shot along a wooded trail in rural Vermont.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 200 1/200 @ f/3.2. There's great detail and color in this rustic scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 100 1/250 @ f/2.8. Again, there's great detail, particularly in the darker Owen, and just a touch of blown highlights where the sun streams through behind the dark, main, subject.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/2.0. ISO 200 1/400 @ f/3.5. We dialed exposure compensation back to -2/3 in this cross-lit, high contrast scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with Olympus Zuiko 35-100 f/3.0. ISO 200 1/640 @ f/5. We dialed back exposure compensation to -2/3 again to showcase the translucent leaves glowing in the sunlight.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with kit D Leica 14-50 f/3.8-5.6 OIS lens. ISO 200 1/400 @ f/10. There's great detail and color in this skyward shot of Vermont mountain foliage.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with D Leica 14-50 f/3.8-5.6 OIS lens. ISO 100 1/320 @ f/9, EV -2/3. Even with the blazing midday sun in the frame, the L10 manages to do a very nice job of holding detail in this scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with D Leica 14-50 f/3.8-5.6 OIS lens. ISO 200 1/800 @ f/5. There's great detail in this very textured scene.Photo By Jack Howard
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Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10 with D Leica 14-50 f/3.8-5.6 OIS lens. ISO 200 1/800 @ f/5. The L10 managed to hold a lot of detail in this challenging scene. Photo by Corey Kaczmarek.Photo By Jack Howard
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Boosting the Exposure, Recovery and Saturation, along with some Curves tweaks brings this image back to near-normal exposure levels.Photo By Jack Howard
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And this ISO 200 shot isn't really much worse for wear, despite a serious initial underexposure! ISO 1/400 @ f/5.6 (when it should've been about 1/125!)Photo By Jack Howard
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We captured this scene at ISO 100 and 1600 in JPEG Capture. The following slides blow up details to 100% pixel view. No adjustments have been made, and the side-by-side comparison slides were saved as Highest Quality JPEGs.Photo By Jack Howard
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ISO 100 (left), ISO 1600 (right). Highest quality JPEG capture with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10.Photo By Jack Howard
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ISO 100 (left), ISO 1600 (right). Highest quality JPEG capture with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10.Photo By Jack Howard
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ISO 100 (left), ISO 1600 (right). Highest quality JPEG capture with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10.Photo By Jack Howard
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ISO 100 (left), ISO 1600 (right). Highest quality JPEG capture with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10.Photo By Jack Howard
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ISO 100 (left), ISO 1600 (right). Highest quality JPEG capture with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-L10.Photo By Jack Howard
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