From Tahrir To Crackdown: Egypt In Photos, Then and Now

Egyptian anti-government protesters clash with riot police at the port city of Suez

Egyptian anti-government protesters clash with riot police at the port city of Suez. Police fired rubber bullets, water cannon and tear gas at hundreds of demonstrators in the eastern city of Suez, on a third day of protests calling for an end to President Hosni Mubarak's 30 year-old-rule. Mohamed Abd El Ghany is a Reuters staffer based in Cairo. He also shoots for the Egypt Independent. See more of his work here and here.Mohamed Abd El Ghany / Reuters

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi throw stones at riot police during clashes around Cairo University and Nahdet Misr Square, where they are camping in Giza

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi throw stones at riot police during clashes around Cairo University and Nahdet Misr Square, where they are camping in Giza, south of Cairo. Security forces killed hundreds during the clashes. Mohamed Abd El Ghany, who also shot the previous photo, is a Reuters staffer based in Cairo. He also shoots for the Egypt Independent.Mohamed Abd El Ghany / Reuters

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo

Egyptians rally at Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo February 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Egyptians, from students and doctors to the jobless poor, swamped Cairo on Tuesday in the biggest demonstration so far in an uprising against an increasingly isolated President Hosni Mubarak. Amr Dalsh is a Reuters staffer based in Cairo, Egypt. He has been with the organization since 2006. Check out more of his incredible work in our Photojournalism of the Year feature.Amr Dalsh / Reuters
Members of the Egyptians Army walk among the smoldering remains of the largest protest camp of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, that was cleared by security forces, in the district of Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt. The death toll keeps going up in Egypt after security forces swept through two sit-in sites. Ahmed Gomaa is a stringer working for the Associated Press in Egypt. His images documenting the violence of the past two days can be seen in pretty much every major newssite in the land.Ahmed Gomaa/AP Photo

The building of the ruling National Democratic party burns after it was set ablaze by protesters on Friday night in Cairo

The building of the ruling National Democratic party burns after it was set ablaze by protesters. Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak refused on Saturday to bow to demands that he resign after ordering troops and tanks into cities in an attempt to quell an explosion of street protests against his 30-year rule. Yannis Behrakis is a Reuters staffer who is no stranger to protests. Check out some of his other work covering the upheaval in Turkey earlier this summer here.Yannis Behrakis / Reuters
Egyptians on a motorbike pass by burnt poster of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi in Nahda Square, near Cairo University in Giza, Cairo. Amr Nabil is an Associated Press staff photographer based in Alexandria, Egypt. See more of his work here.Amr Nabil/AP Photo

Protesters sit atop a military vehicle during demonstrations in Cairo

Protesters sit atop a military vehicle during demonstrations in Cairo January 29, 2011. Thousands of angry Egyptians rallied in central Cairo on Saturday to demand that President Hosni Mubarak resign, dismissing his offer of dialogue and calling on troops to come over to their side. Asmaa Waguih is a Reuters staffer currently based in Egypt. Like many of his other peers featured here, Asmaa is no stranger to violence. Take a look at his previous work documenting the frontlines of Syria here, and see more from Egypt here.Asmaa Waguih/Reuters
A police vehicle is pushed off of the 6th of October bridge by protesters close to the largest sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo, Egypt. Aly Hazzaa is a staffer at El Shorouk Newspaper based in Egypt. See more if his incredible work on hi personal site here.Aly Hazzaa/ AP Photo
And Egyptian man shows off his freshly-painted finger, after voting in Egypt's first freely-held democratic election. I shot this photo while documenting post-revolution Egypt during the Spring of 2012. See more here.Dan Bracaglia
Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi chant slogans against Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi at Nasr City, where protesters have installed a camp and hold daily rallies, in Cairo, Egypt. Hassan Ammar is an AP staffer based in Egypt. See more of his work here.Hassan Ammar/AP Photo

Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation in Cairo

Anti-government protesters celebrate inside Tahrir Square after the announcement of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation in Cairo February 11, 2011. A furious wave of protest finally swept Mubarak from power on Friday after 30 years of one-man rule, sparking jubilation on the streets and sending a warning to autocrats across the Arab world and beyond. Dylan Martinez is a Reuters staffer currently based in the UK. **WARNING: THE NEXT PHOTO IS GRAPHIC IN NATURE. **Dylan Martinez/Reuters

Dead bodies of members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, lie in a room in a field hospital at the Rabaa Adawiya mosque, where they were camping, in Cairo

Dead bodies of members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, lie in a room in a field hospital at the Rabaa Adawiya mosque. Close to 450 protestors were killed during clashes Wednesday. Amr Dalsh is a Reuters staffer based in Cairo, Egypt. See more of his work here and here.Amr Dalsh / Reuters

In 2011, 18 days of protests centered in Cairo's Tahrir square ushered in a new, uncertain political future for Egypt. Over 800 people were killed and over 6,000 injured in these initial protests, officials estimate. Yesterday, as part of the military regime's continued crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood members and supporters of the deposed president Mohammed Morsi, an estimated 525 people were killed in a single day.

Every revolution brings as much uncertainty as change, and yet the climate following the military's seizure of power appears to have shifted dramattically. But do all photos of protests look the same?