See the Vintage Space Photos that Put Our World Into Perspective

One small step for man with camera, one giant leap for photography

Apollo 11, 1969© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Ed White Floating in Space," June 1965© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Saturn's Northern Mid-latitudes," Aug. 21, 1981© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Buzz Aldrin's Footprint in Lunar Soil," July 31, 1969© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Shepard Besides U.S. Flag in Fra Mauro Base. Shadow of Michell in Front," 1971© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Commander Cernan Getting on Boardof the Lunar Rover," December 1972© Harrison Schmitt—NASA/Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Surface of Venus," March 16, 1992© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Coronagraph of the Sun," April 1980© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Foot Pad of Apollo 11 Lunar Module on Lunar Surface," July, 1969© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Charlie Brown Over the Moon," July 1969© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Reflections from the Landing Module," February 1971© NASA—Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London
"Earth rise over Moon (Smyth's Sea)," July 20, 1969© Mike Collins—NASA/Courtesy of Daniel Blau Munich/London

Curiosity about the limits of our existence is programmed into our nature. Humankind has spent centuries working to explore the outermost reaches of the unknown. Among life’s mysteries, the universe has proven to be the most seductive and open-ended of them all.

To feed this curiosity, Daniel Blau Gallery in London is hosting "Apollo 8 x 10," an exhibition of vintage photographs taken beyond the limits of our atmosphere on NASA space explorations. The photographs, while incredibly useful to the growth of science and our understanding of the universe, are also extremely beautiful as works of art.

The title of the exhibit is a play on words that connects the classic large-format 8 x 10 camera with Apollo missions numbers 8 and 10—underlining the strong connection between science and art. The Apollos are some of the earliest and most pivotal space explorations in history with 12 total manned missions. Apollo 8 was the first manned mission to the moon with Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders becoming the first humans in lunar orbit on December 24, 1968. The mission is also famous for Anders’ iconic “Earthrise” image, the first which turned the lens on our own planet.

"We were told that on Christmas Eve we would have the largest audience that had ever listened to a human voice," Borman recalled during the 40th anniversary celebrations in 2008. "And the only instructions that we got from NASA was to do something appropriate."

The photos in the collection were taken on both manned and unmanned NASA missions, and include images taken not only from Apollo, but also Viking, Pioneer, Gemini, and Skylab missions, among others. The prints in the exhibition are visually stunning, but also strike a familiar cord within many of us, reminding us of the infinite universe that surrounds us. Photographs of footsteps pressed into unfamiliar ground make us question not only what lies beyond our planet, but also the significance of our own being.

"Apollo 8 x 10" will be on view at Daniel Blau Gallery in London from April 10 - May 15, 2015.

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