Tip of the Day: Animal Arrangement

There are two common problems with most people’s wildlife photos: The subject is either too far away or too centered in the frame, creating a static, boring composition. Look at the entire image in the viewfinder before you snap, and consider these tips for better animal pictures.• Get as close as possible to the animal.

There are two common problems with most people’s wildlife photos: The subject is either too far away or too centered in the frame, creating a static, boring composition. Look at the entire image in the viewfinder before you snap, and consider these tips for better animal pictures.

•  Follow the Rule of Thirds for wildlife in motion, but be sure to place your subject so that it moves into the frame rather than exiting it.

•  Get as close as possible to the animal. Aside from using a powerful telephoto lens, try waiting in a blind (a camouflaged structure) for wildlife to come to you.

• Use a wide-angle lens to show an animal in its environment.

• Try shooting from different angles and turning your camera vertically.

ADAPTED FROM THE BETTERPHOTO GUIDE TO DIGITAL NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM MIOTKE (AMPHOTO BOOKS, 2007; $25)

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