Tip of the Day: Shoot the Moon

• Winter months are the best for shooting by the light of the moon. The nights are longer, and the moon has a higher trajectory in the sky.

While a full moon may be an excuse for strange behavior, it’s also the best time for nocturnal photography—not just for pictures of the moon itself but to harness the effect of its light on the landscape. Keep in mind:

• Winter months are the best for shooting by the light of the moon. The nights are longer, and the moon has a higher trajectory in the sky.

• A rule similar to the “Sunny 16” standard for daytime exposures applies to shooting a full moon: At f/11, set a shutter speed of 1/ISO.

• The strong light from a full moon is further amplified by reflective surfaces such as water, metal, and snow. Photos taken in these conditions can easily be overexposed and look like they were taken in daylight.

ADAPTED FROM NIGHT & LOW-LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY: PROFESSIONAL TECHNIQUES FROM EXPERTS FOR ARTISTIC AND COMMERCIAL SUCCESS BY JILL WATERMAN (AMPHOTO BOOKS, 2008; $30)

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