Sony BMG Sells Photos from its Archive, Ineptly

We just saw on Wired.com that music company Sony BMG is selling prints of images from its archive. With CD sales in the dumper, the company is looking for alternative sources of revenue—what we in the digital content business call leveraging one’s assets. But we’ve spotted a couple of problems with the venture.

We just saw on Wired.com that music company Sony BMG is selling prints of images from its archive. With CD sales in the dumper, the company is looking for alternative sources of revenue—what we in the digital content business call leveraging one's assets.
But we've spotted a couple of problems with the venture. For one thing, the image catalog doesn't usually list the names of the photographers who took the images.
Most of the pictures show musical artists from the Columbia label during recording sessions—we're talking Dylan, Cash, Miles, Mingus, Monk, Mathis, and my favorite, Glenn Gould (above).
Sony's Icon Collectibles website is pretty much what you'd expect from a music company selling photography—a little light on specific details. It doesn't say exactly what it means by "fine-art digital prints," though I'll guess they're modern ink-jet prints. Prices range from $300 to $1,699, depending on size, framing, and editioning.
But my biggest complaint is about the photographic information missing from the catalog. If I'm buying a photograph, I want to know all about its history, including the name of the photographer.—David Schonauer