Book Review: What Matters

The hardcover print version of the book will go on sale on Sept. 16, but the free online E-version of the book is available now at whatmattersonline.com. There you can also check out the “What You Can Do” section for a list of further information on all the issues covered in the book (from Climate Change to Child Labor, US Veterans, Global Poverty, etc.) as well as ways to get involved and help the change the world.

Changing the world might sound like a lofty goal for a photo book, but that's what the new book, What Matters, The World's Preeminent Photojournalists and Thinkers Depict Essential Issues of our Time edited by David Elliot Cohen (Sterling Publishing, $28, 2008), hopes to do. Citing the power of socially conscious photographers over the last 150 years, the beautiful collection of 18 photo-essays by some of today's prominent photojournalists hopes to "inform pre-election debate and inspire direct action."

Regardless of what side of the political fence you sit on, this collection of heartbreaking and powerful stories and images is guaranteed to get you thinking.

The hardcover print version of the book will go on sale on Sept. 16, but the free online E-version of the book is available now at whatmattersonline.com. There you can also check out the "What You Can Do" section for a list of further information on all the issues covered in the book (from Climate Change to Child Labor, US Veterans, Global Poverty, etc.) as well as ways to get involved and help the change the world.

_—Kathleen Davis
Assistant Editor
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February 2003: A 4 year old girl child fetches water for her family and will walk 4 kilometres back with the heavy pail. She makes this trip on average twice a day. Water is the responsibility of women and children in Africa. Many women and young girls live lives which revolve around an endless cycle of walking for water. In many cases this is something which takes up hours of every day and precludes women from education, quality of life and private enterprise. Brent Stirton

](http://flash.popphoto.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/2008/08/22/stirtonbs33_3.jpg) _
Water is the responsibility of women and children in Africa. This four-year old girl walks four kilometers twice a day to fetch water for her family. From "Thirsty World," a photo-essay by Brent Stirton in What Matters: The World's Preeminent Photojournalists and Thinkers Depict Essential Issues of Our Time by David Elliot Cohen (Sterling 2008)