Photography Hall of Shame New Inductee

A highway is public property, and according to a report from tricities.com, the photograph was taken at a place where there was “no reasonable expectation of privacy,” like the Tennessee code states.

Sheriff’s deputy arrests man for taking his picture

If you thought the war on photography was confined to metropolises like New York City or Washington DC, you're wrong. In Tennessee, a Johnson county sheriff's deputy arrested Scott Conover for taking a picture of him with his camera phone.
Conover took a picture of a sheriff's deputy on the side of the road during a traffic stop. Immediately, one wonders, "Isn't a highway public property?"

A highway is public property, and according to a report from tricities.com, the photograph was taken at a place where there was "no reasonable expectation of privacy," like the Tennessee code states.

When the deputy discovered that he had taken a picture of him, Conover recalls, "[the deputy] said if you don't give it to me, you're going to jail."
In affidavit that followed, the deputy claimed that he saw a red light, which he perceived to be a laser. Conover responded by explaining that, "At no time did I have a laser. I had an iPhone."

Reportedly, the deputy never questioned Conover about the laser at the time of the incident, he was only concerned with the photograph.

The American Civil Liberties Union confirmed that there is no law that prohibits anyone from taking photographs in public areas, even if the subject is a police officer. Conover is scheduled to appear in court on August 6, but the charges will most likely be dropped.

—Kaitlin Tambuscio
Editorial Intern

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