Balog On How to Shoot an Ice Berg

I recently attended the Photography at the Summit workshop in Jackson, Wyoming, and I was able to hear photographer James Balog give a slideshow featuring work from his Extreme Ice Survey project. For the past couple of years, Balog, a frequent contributor of American Photo, has been documenting the rapid melting of glacier. Using still images, time-lapse images, and video, he is able to show climate change in action. I urge you to go to the EIS website and look at the imagery there. The beauty

I recently attended the Photography at the Summit workshop in Jackson, Wyoming, and I was able to hear photographer James Balog give a slideshow featuring work from his Extreme Ice Survey project. For the past couple of years, Balog, a frequent contributor of American Photo, has been documenting the rapid melting of glacier. Using still images, time-lapse images, and video, he is able to show climate change in action. I urge you to go to the EIS website and look at the imagery there. The beauty of the landscapes he is shooting is just unbelievable. In addition, he's been making "beauty shots" of ice formations that are really something. (Below is a video showing Balog in action making these pictures. The video is part of a promotion for one of the project's sponsors, Nikon, but you'll be able to see what he was going for, and how he lit these images.)
By the way, when you're on the EIS site, be sure to click the button for videos. The second clip shows one of the largest iceberg calvings ever documented. The ice berg was about 1,500 feet long and rose 300 feet above the sea. You've got to see it.—David Schonauer