Your Photo: Our Critique

Randall Chancellor took this photograph at a Botanical Garden. Seeing some nice tones Randall converted this into black-and-white in Photoshop by desaturating the file. To produce a true black-and-white, making the most of the details and tones, it is more complicated than just desaturating the file. There are a number of ways to make the conversion, Debbie Grossman has a pretty simple approach here. There are other more complicated conversion approaches but all of them avoid the straight desatu

Randall Chancellor took this photograph at a Botanical Garden. Seeing some nice tones Randall converted this into black-and-white in Photoshop by desaturating the file. To produce a true black-and-white, making the most of the details and tones, it is more complicated than just desaturating the file. There are a number of ways to make the conversion, Debbie Grossman has a pretty simple approach here. There are other more complicated conversion approaches but all of them avoid the straight desaturation. If you really enjoy the black-and-white look, do your homework and try different conversions until you find one that you like and gives you the best black-and-white image from your shots.

To improve upon this image it needs to be exposed properly. The file submitted is underexposed which can be fixed working with the levels in Photoshop but it would benefit the final image more if exposed correctly when the photo was taken. The focus could be sharper on the ferns, closed down your aperture to keep everything in focus. Instead of using f/4.5 try f/8, that will give you more depth of field allowing the ferns and the back foliage to be in focus.
_—Melissa Macatee
Contributing Blogger

_This photo gets three stars on the PopPhoto Flash rating system.

The PopPhoto Flash rating system.
*= This part of the camera is called the lens
**= Don't quit your day job
***= Good, but not yet great
****=So close you can taste it
*****= Yes, a thousand times yes!

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