Where to Go and What to See

Finally, I can't escape the feeling that it's become passé to recommend Alec Soth (sorry Alec). But in going back over his Dog Days, Bogotá series (on view at the Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis) I've decided I just don't care. The work--created in his adopted daughter's hometown partially as a way to record for her the place she came from--is simply too good not to be seen. It's quiet, and beautiful, and tragic, and funny. What more can we ask for.

Three grids of images, each from a different city: Paris, New York, and Shanghai. Two are of men on motorcycles, one is of bike messengers. Sure, it's kind of a gimmick, but for some reason it totally works. In his book on the three cities (images from which are on view at the Aperture Gallery in New York City), Hans Eijkelboom has created an incredible study of street life in each--and a rare opportunity to compare among the three. In capturing everything from little old ladies in flowered dresses to teenagers with mohawks, always in sets of 10 or more images, he draws attention to the diversity of the cities, but equally to the way styles are repeated and permutated in such dense urban areas.

Cornucopia: Documenting the Land of Plenty also deals with issues of density and consumption. On view at the Montserrat College of Art Gallery, I'm guessing this show is worth a look mostly from the young photographers included in it. JeongMee Yoon created an incredible book this year, Pink & Blue Project, which American Photo is featuring in our upcoming best books issue. Her photographs chronicle the color worship of toddlers (and their parents) by creating portraits of the children surrounded by their pink and blue objects. I'm also a fan of Chris Jordan, whose series Running the Numbers and Portraits of American Mass Consumption are both beautiful and terrifying, and Brian Ulrich, whose Copia work documents huge commercial centers such as Target and Home Depot.

Finally, I can't escape the feeling that it's become passé to recommend Alec Soth (sorry Alec). But in going back over his Dog Days, Bogotá series (on view at the Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis) I've decided I just don't care. The work--created in his adopted daughter's hometown partially as a way to record for her the place she came from--is simply too good not to be seen. It's quiet, and beautiful, and tragic, and funny. What more can we ask for.

~Miki Johnson

(Photo: "Cell phone chargers, Atlanta, 2004" from Chris Jordan's Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption series)

Click the link below for details about these and many more photography openings and events across the country.

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