Music Photography in Three/Four Time

The collection of images here represents a good solution to a depressing problem. The problem is how little time musicians give photographers when it comes to shooting their performances. Once, performers welcomed the attention, and a wonderful genre of photojournalism grew out of the unfettered access photographers were given during rock concerts. Now, like other celebrities, musicians want to strictly control how they are photographed. As the New York Times reports today, this trend may have r

The collection of images here represents a good solution to a depressing problem. The problem is how little time musicians give photographers when it comes to shooting their performances. Once, performers welcomed the attention, and a wonderful genre of photojournalism grew out of the unfettered access photographers were given during rock concerts. Now, like other celebrities, musicians want to strictly control how they are photographed. As the New York Times reports today, this trend may have reach its zenith at a Stevie Wonder performance in Madison Square Garden over the weekend. Photographers were told they could shoot only the first five to ten seconds of the singer's entrance and the first 60 seconds of his first song. Faced with those restrictions, photographer Michael Nagle constructed this three-image by four-image collage to illustrate the newspaper's review of the concert.
--David Schonauer