Letter of the Week: Not Faking It

I just wanted to thank Popular Photography for addressing an ever increasing issue for camera accessories. Many people choose to ignore the possible implications of getting a better than good deal online through sources like eBay. The bottom line is many of these sources are no different than the modern version of buying a Rolex on a street corner. A person would need to be naïve to assume the item being purchased isn’t likely to be fake, stolen, grey market, or supporting some kind of criminal/

To: POP Editor
Subject: Response to Neil Matthews' "Real of Fake?" (Sept 2007)

I just wanted to thank Popular Photography for addressing an ever increasing issue for camera accessories. Many people choose to ignore the possible implications of getting a better than good deal online through sources like eBay. The bottom line is many of these sources are no different than the modern version of buying a Rolex on a street corner. A person would need to be naïve to assume the item being purchased isn’t likely to be fake, stolen, grey market, or supporting some kind of criminal/terrorist activity.

As a consumer, we must be accountable for our actions. I was very disappointed in one of the responses received in the November issue on this article. Terrorists don’t simply raise money through obvious sources otherwise they would be easy to stop. Nonetheless, I don’t see how arguing about whether my memory card came from a terrorist or an ordinary criminal has much of a point.

The online forums are filled with people who buy $10 memory cards, filters, batteries and other items wondering if the item is legit. Most of the time the answer should be obvious, but we need more articles like this to remind us, “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is…”.

Doug Yates
York,PA