Q&A with Time Magazine's MaryAnne Golon

I don't want to jump on the bandwagon of people saying that photojournalism is dead, but it has never been in worse shape than it is right now. The internet is the fastest, quickest most amazing way to reach the public that we've ever had and that's all very exciting. It represents a much larger market for photojournalism than we've ever had before. But in terms of traditional outlets, in how images get displayed and support for long-term projects, the market has really contracted. Time is still

John McDermott tipped us off to an in-depth Q&A he just published with Time magazine director of photography MaryAnne Golon on the Canon Europe website. In December of last year Golon took over the top photo editing spot at the magazine for her longtime mentor, Michelle Stephenson. At the time, I wrote:

Golon … is younger and spunkier than Stephenson and perhaps better equipped to grapple with the changing media landscape. The future for newsweeklies in print is anything but certain, and Golon should have her hands full over the next few years guiding the magazine into the digital age.

So what shape is photojournalism in today? I don't want to jump on the bandwagon of people saying that photojournalism is dead, but it has never been in worse shape than it is right now. The internet is the fastest, quickest most amazing way to reach the public that we've ever had and that's all very exciting. It represents a much larger market for photojournalism than we've ever had before. But in terms of traditional outlets, in how images get displayed and support for long-term projects, the market has really contracted. Time is still one of the places that embraces photojournalism and we want to be able to do it whenever we can. I think it's just becoming harder and harder to support longer-term projects given the amount of space we're devoting to it.