Where to Go and What to See

And taking that cue, several other museums are putting up photography shows this week. There's Richard Prince at the Guggenheim, and New Photography 2007 at the MoMA, its yearly survey of innovations in the art of photography. The Art Institute of Chicago is showing Richard Misrach's On the Beach, the Hallmark Museum of Contemporary Art is showing Michael Yamashita's Silk Road and The Great Wall, and even the Harvard Museum of Natural History is getting in the game with a show of Henry Horenstei

I've had this vague feeling for a while that there must be some secret monthly meeting of gallery owners and museum curators where they decide who's having what when. And I never know about it until the press releases start to trickle in. This week only confirms my suspicions. The tribunal has obviously decided that this is the week of big museum openings, and, in New York at least, most of the galleries have graciously gotten out of their way.

Probably the biggest opening is at the Met, where a show on paper negatives is opening in its historical photography gallery and, a much bigger deal, the inaugural show in the museum's brand new post-1960s photography gallery is going up. Depth of Field: Contemporary Photography at the Metropolitan is designed to showcase some of the spectacular (and spectacularly large) contemporary photographs the museum has acquired in recent years, but the gallery itself is the most exciting aspect of the show, placing contemporary photography in its rightful place within the pantheon of "real" art.

And taking that cue, several other museums are putting up photography shows this week. There's Richard Prince at the Guggenheim, and New Photography 2007 at the MoMA, its yearly survey of innovations in the art of photography. The Art Institute of Chicago is showing Richard Misrach's On the Beach, the Hallmark Museum of Contemporary Art is showing Michael Yamashita's Silk Road and The Great Wall, and even the Harvard Museum of Natural History is getting in the game with a show of Henry Horenstein's animal images. Then, of course, there is ICP, which might as well be a museum (although it obviously always shows photography). This season it's showing related exhibitions about war coverage and specifically the Spanish Civil War (including Capa, Gerda Taro, and Frances Torrres).

Follow the link for details about these and other events around the country.

(Photo: "Republican militiawoman training on beach outside Barcelona," by Gerda Taro, © International Center of Photography)