Nature Watch: Lunar Eclipse from Down Under

We're always on the lookout for high-impact nature images, but I never thought I'd see one that captured a lunar eclipse. Such a phenomenon, when the moon passes through the Earth's defined by darkness, which is a problem, photographically speaking. But here we have something special. This shot, by Tim Wimbourne for Reuters, shows a lunar eclipse as seen in Sydney, Australia on August 28. The moon appears red because some sunlight normally reflected off of it is bent and scattered as it passes t

We're always on the lookout for high-impact nature images, but I never thought I'd see one that captured a lunar eclipse. Such a phenomenon, when the moon passes through the Earth's shadow, is defined by darkness, which is a problem, photographically speaking. But here we have something special. This shot, by Tim Wimbourne for Reuters, shows a lunar eclipse as seen in Sydney, Australia on August 28. The moon appears red because some sunlight normally reflected off of it is bent and scattered as it passes through the earth's atmosphere--a sort of natural diffuser, if you will. The best part of a lunar eclipse: You can stare at the moon as long as you want. Don't howl, however.
--David Schonauer

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