The Brooklynites

Since moving to the Big Apple over eight years ago I've lived almost exclusively in Brooklyn, and as far as I'm concerned it's the only borough that matters. There's something about commuting into Manhattan five days a week that makes you appreciate the slower pace and (relatively speaking) wide open spaces of Kings County. A community exists here that's different from everything around it. It's a diverse mix of both longtime locals and new transplants.

Since moving to the Big Apple over eight years ago I've lived almost exclusively in Brooklyn, and as far as I'm concerned it's the only borough that matters. There's something about commuting into Manhattan five days a week that makes you appreciate the slower pace and (relatively speaking) wide open spaces of Kings County. A community exists here that's different from everything around it. It's a diverse mix of both longtime locals and new transplants. It's hip and happening, with its local arts scene, nightlife and great restaurants, but (other than the obvious exception of Williamsburg) people aren't pretending to be something they're not. Above all, Brooklyn is a place that feels like home for nearly 2.5 million Manhattan refugees.

Photographer Seth Kushner and writer/editor/curator Anthony LaSala set about several years ago to capture the indomitable spirit of Brooklyn, and their new book, titled The Brooklynites (powerHouse Books), is the culmination of their hard work.