From Groundbreaking Photography to Groundbreaking Music

How Lee Friedlander’s photography inspired his son to pick up a …cello.

Lee Friedlander is among of the most influential American photographers of the last 50 years. Author of numerous photography books, he worked for Atlantic Records, shooting album covers of jazz and rhythm & blues figures from Ray Charles to John Coltrane. Friedlander was a key figure in the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) 1967 as groundbreaking New Documents exhibition, and over the years has won several awards and much acclaim. His vision of the American social landscape was the subject of a solo MoMA retrospective in 2005.

Lee's son, Erik Friedlander, spent the majority of his childhood surrounded by his father's work, and often his loud music. Rather than being inspired to pick a camera, though, Erik picked up a cello.

Success and a pioneering artistic vision may run in the Friedlander family, but Erik, who’s music has been called haunting and passionate, has never had much of an interested in photography.

Above photo by Lee Friedlander from the liner notes of Erik Friedlander's new album Block Ice and Propane