Nature Watch: A Moon for the Misbegotten

One of the more troublesome of photographic facts (at least for those who consider photography an art) is the incredible beauty of images made by robot cameras far away in the heavens. This image, taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in 2005, shows one of Saturn's moons, Hyperion. Scientists now believe the image is of value because it suggests that the moon's cup-like craters are reservoirs for hyrdocarbons—the ingredients for life (at least as we know it).

One of the more troublesome of photographic facts (at least for those who consider photography an art) is the incredible beauty of images made by robot cameras far away in the heavens. This image, taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in 2005, shows one of Saturn's moons, Hyperion. Scientists now believe the image is of value because it suggests that the moon's cup-like craters are reservoirs for hyrdocarbons—the ingredients for life (at least as we know it). I take satisfaction in the knowledge that the spacecraft is the handiwork of mankind; therefore, in some way this image can be seen as another example of human ingenuity, human creativity, and human values. We continue to view the heavens in our own image. That is enough art for me.
--David Schonauer