Where to Go and What to See

(Photo: © Noah Kalina/Courtesy NoahKalina.com)

It's official. Digital imaging has now been around long enough to warrant an "Evolution of" show -- and I for one am ecstatic. The Evolution of the Digital Portrait, opening June 28 at ClampArt in NYC, looks back at the last 35 years or so, during which digital portraits went from cutting edge to completely second nature. I'm really interested to see the techniques developed by Nancy Burson and MIT in the 70s to create composite portraits, not least of all because it was later purchased by the FBI to create "aged" portraits of missing persons. But I have to say I'm even more excited to see the opposing views artists have taken of the "meaning" of digital imaging, from bleak to innocuous, and to feel that we have come out safely on the other side. Because as happy as I am to see a curated selection of different photographer's attitudes towards "the digital," I'm a little sick of it being the major theme of too many projects. From the ClampArt press release: "Noah Kalina, the youngest artist in the exhibition, uses digital photography as a matter of fact, harnessing a technology that is so second nature, so innately ingrained, it requires no elaborate address." That's what I like to hear -- and see.

~Miki Johnson

(Photo: © Noah Kalina/Courtesy NoahKalina.com)

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