The Crime of Photography

A few months ago there was a story about a photojournalist arrested in Miami for taking photos of police officers on the street. Now comes the story of another photographer, Walter Miller, who was questioned by police in Indianapolis for taking a photo of public art that included a portion of Indianapolis City County Building in the background (pictured at left). Indianapolis police stopped Miller and asked to view the photos in his camera as a matter of homeland security, citing that pictures o

A few months ago there was a story about a photojournalist arrested in Miami for taking photos of police officers on the street. Now comes the story of another photographer, Walter Miller, who was questioned by police in Indianapolis for taking a photo of public art that included a portion of Indianapolis City County Building in the background (pictured at left). Indianapolis police stopped Miller and asked to view the photos in his camera as a matter of homeland security, citing that pictures of certain government facilities are off limits.

While Miller was allowed to keep his photos and was not arrested, IMPD officials say that they didn’t violate any rights in the questioning and search. According to authorities in Indianapolis, law enforcement officials are concerned about pictures of federal office buildings, military installations, major bridges, and other infrastructure that could be terrorists targets.

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