Seeing Without a Camera

If there are photographers today who are able to, as the famous Diane Arbus quote goes, “teach people to see without a camera,” Melissa Ann Pinney might be the equivalent of our wise older neighbor who sits daily on the front porch: her photographs freeze-frame the tiny daily moments of suburban American life, revealing hidden ironies and emotions that we might otherwise overlook.Her new photographs, opening today at Alan Klotz Gallery (511 W 25th St.

If there are photographers today who are able to, as the famous Diane Arbus quote goes, "teach people to see without a camera," Melissa Ann Pinney might be the equivalent of our wise older neighbor who sits daily on the front porch: her photographs freeze-frame the tiny daily moments of suburban American life, revealing hidden ironies and emotions that we might otherwise overlook.
Her new photographs, opening today at Alan Klotz Gallery (511 W 25th St. New York, NY, 10001), are yet another chapter in the lesson plan; where previous lectures may have been titled The Secret Wisdom of Children or The Comedy of Rituals, newer Pinney photographs seem to point out truths more complicated and serious—a good title might be, This Moment was More Important Than You Thought It Was. Opening today from 6 to 8 p.m. and running through June 30.
—Lori Fredickson