A Tale of Two Photos

Associated Press photographer Gerald Herbert snapped a low-angle view of the president leaving the podium following the briefing. The picture does a good job in capturing the forcefulness of Bush as a commander in chief engaged in an intense bout of political brinkmanship with congress. I found the picture at washingtonpost.com.

Sometimes photography is like real estate. It’s all about location, location, location, as two news pictures made at yesterday’s White House news briefing with President Bush illustrate.

At the briefing, the president warned Democrats in Congress that they were undercutting American soldiers in Iraq by passing laws linking the financing of the war to troop withdrawals.

Associated Press photographer Gerald Herbert snapped a low-angle view of the president leaving the podium following the briefing. The picture does a good job in capturing the forcefulness of Bush as a commander in chief engaged in an intense bout of political brinkmanship with congress. I found the picture at washingtonpost.com.

Compare that photo to the one in the New York Times by Stephen Crowley, who moved to Bush's left during the briefing. No depth of field issues here: out in the distance, seemingly standing behind a bush, is Vice President Dick Cheney. (The moment was also captured on video. Go here to see it.)

Now we can discuss amongst ourselves the relative meanings of these two images. Which one best captured the truth of the moment?