The World According to Bendiksen

I can't quite believe, when I look through Jonas Bendiksen's Satellites (Aperture, $35), that this twenty-something photographer is a member of Magnum. It's not that I don't like the work in the book, which is on its surface a survey of the grim hinterlands of the late Soviet Union. (I think it's really good.) It's that Bendiksen's visual language is more akin to that of contemporary art photography than to any style I would once have associated with the venerable photo agency.

I can't quite believe, when I look through Jonas Bendiksen's Satellites (Aperture, $35), that this twenty-something photographer is a member of Magnum. It's not that I don't like the work in the book, which is on its surface a survey of the grim hinterlands of the late Soviet Union. (I think it's really good.) It's that Bendiksen's visual language is more akin to that of contemporary art photography than to any style I would once have associated with the venerable photo agency.

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